The Flatbed Trailer

Flatbed Trailer Usage, Pricing, Services & Freight Quotes


Sam Boyd

May 7, 2024

Join the community!

Flatbed Trailer:

Usage, Pricing, Services & Freight Quotes


Sam Boyd
May 7, 2024


Join the community!

When you need to haul goods in an unenclosed container due to its size, shape or unique loading requirements, a flatbed trailer is your trailer of choice. This great versatility of flatbeds is expanded even further because they come in numerous designs, which we’ll detail in this article. We'll also explore the essential aspects of these trailers, including their unique features, applications, advantages, specifications, and more. 

Last but not least, we'll provide valuable insights for understanding:

  • Flatbed trailer freight pricing,
  • How to select a reliable flatbed trailer freight broker for your next shipment,
  • And provide information about where to quickly and easily get a freight quote for a flatbed trailer

What is a Flatbed Trailer?

Flatbed trailers offer a simple yet effective solution for hauling cargo that doesn't fit well in enclosed trailers or requires top-loading and unloading capabilities. Unlike dry vans, flatbed trailers feature an open and flat platform without walls or roofs, making them suitable for a variety of cargo types, including oversized, heavy, or irregularly shaped loads.

Types of Flatbed Trailers

The class of flatbed trailers come in several configurations to accommodate different types of cargo. What they all have in common is their  “deck over design”, which simply means the deck lies flat over the wheels. And no matter the configuration, every type of flatbed trailer also lacks side walls or a top roof, and this open design allows for easy side or top loading when necessary. 

Next, we’ll detail some of the more popular trailers that fall into the flatbed category that are commonly used in freight.

Standard Flatbed Trailer

This is the most common type of flatbed trailer, featuring a flat, open deck with no sides or roof. Typically between 48-53’,it’s a versatile trailer option and can transport a wide range of goods, including construction materials, machinery, and more.

Step Deck Flatbed Trailer

The flatbed variant of step deck trailers have a lower deck in the front section, providing added vertical clearance. This design is advantageous for transporting tall or oversized cargo that requires more headroom.

Extendable Flatbed Trailer

The flatbed variant of extendable trailers can be adjusted to various lengths, allowing for the transportation of exceptionally long or oversized cargo. This flexibility makes them suitable for specialized hauling requirements.

Multi-Axle Flatbed Trailer

Multi-axle flatbed trailers are equipped with additional axles to accommodate heavier loads while ensuring stability and compliance with local regulations. Double, triple and even quadruple axle flatbeds exist for hauling extra heavy machinery.

Drop Deck Flatbed Trailer:

The flatbed variant of drop deck trailers feature a lower deck in the front section, similar to step deck trailers, but also have a drop in the rear section. This design allows for added vertical clearance and easier loading and unloading. It also comes in a double drop-deck option.

Lowboy Trailer

Given their low center of gravity and extra-high clearance, lowboy trailers are the ideal trailer for hauling oversized cargo that won’t fit on a standard or step-deck flatbed trailer. This makes them ideal for hauling huge machinery like bulldozers, construction vehicles or other super-sized cargo. 

Gooseneck Trailer (Folding and Removable or “RGN”)

gooseneck trailer is a type of flatbed trailer defined by its long, arching neck that connects over the deck of the trailer rather than down at the floor-level like a standard bumper pull trailer. This allows for better load balancing and a tighter turning radius, which can prove essential in a crowded or urban environments 

Gooseneck trailers come in both folding and removable (RGN) options. 

Conestoga Trailer

Defined by their rolling tarp system over the cargo area, conestoga trailers combine the convenience of a flatbed design combined with the protective cover provided by a dry van trailer.


Side-kit Trailer

Side-kit trailers are a variant of flatbeds with removable sides, adding some degree of enclosure and protection from the elements, especially from wind and road debris.

Specifications of Flatbed Trailers

Cargo Carried

Flatbed trailers are versatile and can transport a wide variety of goods, including construction materials, machinery, vehicles, and more.

Trailer Length Options:

Flatbed trailers come in various lengths, ranging from standard 48-foot trailers to extended lengths as needed for specialized applications.

Dimensions:

The maximum dimensions typically adhere to standard semi-trailer specifications, ensuring compatibility with transportation infrastructure.

Axles:

Flatbed trailers are typically equipped with 2 to 3 axles, depending on load capacity and local regulations.

Trailer Weight:

The weight of a flatbed trailer varies based on design and material but generally falls within the range of 10,000 to 30,000 lbs.

Maximum Load:

Maximum load capacities depend on the trailer's design and quantity of axles but must comply with regulations to ensure safe and legal transportation. The max load on US roadways is 80,000 lbs.

Unique Features and Advantages of Flatbed Trailers

Flatbed trailers are equipped with unique features that set them apart from enclosed trailers and make them suitable for various cargo types.

Open Deck Design: Ease of Loading and Unloading:

The most prominent feature unique to flatbed trailers is their open deck design. This lack of walls or roof allows for quick and efficient loading and unloading of cargo from the top, sides or rear, making them much more versatile than a dry van or box truck. an open, flat deck with no walls or roof, allowing for easy loading and unloading from the top, sides, or rear.

Variety of Sizes and Types: Allows for High Loading Capacity

Another great feature of flatbed trailers is the diversity of sizes and designs available. As you’ve learned, there are various types of flatbed trailer designs available for freight shipments depending on if you need additional cargo capacity, load capacity, higher clearance, better turn radius, or some level of protection from the elements.

Securement Options

Just because flatbeds have an open design, that doesn’t mean the cargo they carry is insecure. Flatbed trailers come with various cargo securement options, including straps, chains, d-ring, tie down points or stake pockets. Rest assured, no matter what you’re transporting, your goods will be secured to prevent damage no matter which type of flatbed you choose.

Applications and Common Cargo of Flatbed Trailers

Given flatbed trailers’ great versatility and variety of designs, they have applications across numerous industries, serving a broad range of shipping needs, including:

Construction and Building Materials: Flatbed trailers are commonly used to transport construction materials, lumber, steel, concrete forms, and heavy machinery to construction sites.

Manufacturing and Industrial: Industrial equipment, machinery, and oversized components can be efficiently transported using flatbed trailers.

Agriculture: Flatbed trailers are utilized for hauling farm equipment, large bales of hay, and other agricultural products.

Automotive: Flatbed trailers are great for transporting vehicles, including cars, trucks, and heavy machinery, similar to car carrier trailers.

Wind Energy: The wind energy industry relies on flatbed trailers to transport wind turbine components, tower sections, and blades to wind farm sites.

Permits and Compliance Requirements for Flatbed Trailers

Compliance and permit requirements for flatbed trailers are essential to ensure safe and legal transportation. Specific regulations may vary by state and type of cargo, but here are some key considerations when transporting goods via flatbed in the United States:

Overdimensional Permits: Depending on the size and dimensions of the cargo, overdimensional permits may be required to transport oversized loads on flatbed trailers.

Weight Limits: Flatbed trailers must comply with federal and state weight limits, including axle weight and gross weight restrictions.

Route Surveys: For extremely large or heavy loads, a route survey might be necessary to ensure the planned route can accommodate the size and weight of the load without causing damage to roads, bridges, or other infrastructure.

Escort Vehicles/Pilot Cars: Oversized loads often require escort vehicles or pilot cars. These vehicles help ensure road safety by escorting the flatbed through traffic and alerting other road users.

Safety Equipment and Signage: Loads that exceed certain dimensions must be marked with flags, banners, and lights. This is to increase visibility and warn other drivers, especially in poor visibility conditions.

Load Securement: Proper cargo securement is essential to prevent load shifting during transit. Flatbed trailers must comply with cargo securement regulations outlined in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR).

Hazardous Materials: If flatbed trailers are used to transport hazardous materials, drivers and carriers must adhere to the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) outlined by the FMCSA. This includes obtaining the necessary hazardous materials endorsements on the driver's CDL and complying with specific labeling, placarding, and documentation requirements.

Driver Qualifications: Drivers hauling specialized loads often need additional training or endorsements on their commercial driver's license (CDL), such as for oversized loads or hazardous materials.

Selecting a Flatbed Freight Broker

When hiring a flatbed trailer freight company, consider the following factors to ensure a smooth and reliable transportation process:

  • Reputation and Experience: Research the company's reputation and seek reviews and testimonials from previous clients, particularly those with similar shipping needs.
  • Equipment and Technology: Ensure the company's fleet includes well-maintained and modern flatbed trailers equipped with the latest technology for cargo safety and tracking.
  • Compliance and Certification: Confirm that the flatbed freight company adheres to industry regulations and standards, especially when handling hazardous materials.
  • Security Measures: Assess the company's security protocols to safeguard cargo during transit, including load securement, locking systems, and tracking capabilities.
  • Insurance Coverage: Verify the extent of insurance coverage for your cargo and understand the claims process in case of incidents during transportation.
  • Operational Support: Evaluate the company's customer support and communication capabilities, ensuring timely updates on shipment status.
  • Route Planning and Efficiency: Inquire about the company's route planning strategies to optimize transit times and minimize delays.
  • Environmental Considerations: If environmental sustainability is important to your business, inquire about the company's eco-friendly practices and efforts to reduce emissions.
  • Cost and Billing Transparency: Understand the company's pricing structure and inquire about any additional charges for specialized services. Ensure transparency in billing.

Flatbed Trailer Freight Pricing

Flatbed trailer freight pricing is influenced by a variety of factors, reflecting the complexity of the transportation industry. Here are the key elements that generally determine the cost of shipping using a flatbed trailer:

Distance and Route: The length of the haul is a primary factor. Longer distances increase fuel costs, driver hours, and overall wear and tear on the equipment. Additionally, the specific route taken (including tolls, traffic conditions, and terrain) can affect costs.

Cargo Type and Weight: Heavier and bulkier cargo typically costs more to transport due to the increased fuel consumption and the need for special handling or equipment. Specialized cargo requiring additional care or equipment for securement (like oversized or fragile items) can also increase costs.

Equipment Type: Do you need a standard, step deck, lowboy or RGN?  The type of flatbed needed can influence the price. Specialized or oversized trailers often command a higher rate due to their unique features and limited availability.

Fuel Costs: Fluctuations in fuel prices directly impact freight rates, as fuel is a significant operational cost for carriers.

Seasonal Demand: During peak seasons, when demand for flatbed trailers is high, prices tend to increase. This can be influenced by industry-specific cycles, like construction booms or agricultural harvests.

Supply and Demand in Specific Regions: Availability of flatbed trailers in a particular area can affect pricing. For example, if there's a surplus of loads needing transport from a region but a shortage of available trailers, prices may increase.

Accessorial Charges: Additional services like tarping, layovers, detention time, or special permits for oversized/overweight loads can add to the cost.

Market Conditions: The overall economic environment, including industry trends and regulatory changes, can impact freight rates.

Insurance Costs: Higher-value cargo may require additional insurance, which can increase the overall shipping cost.

Understanding these factors can help shippers negotiate fair rates that reflect the specific needs and challenges of each flatbed shipment. It's also worth noting that rates can vary significantly between carriers and over time, so it's beneficial for shippers to stay informed about current market conditions.

If you’re looking for a great rate on flatbed freight, we’d recommend contacting a freight broker like Guided Freight. We work with all the major carriers, meaning we have the largest inventory of flatbeds in the US market. And given we book flatbeds for our customers virtually everyday, we’re able to pass along savings thanks to our high-volume rates, providing significant cost-savings for our customers.

Flatbed Trailer Services & Freight Quote

If your company requires the services of a flatbed trailer for a freight shipment, Guided Freight is happy to assist. As a trusted freight broker, we specialize in managing complex logistics for seamless transportation. Obtaining a flatbed trailer freight quote from our company is quick and straightforward.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between a flatbed trailer and a low-bed trailer?

The primary difference between a flatbed and a lowbed trailer is the height capacity. Low bed trailers like step and drop decks allow for the transport of cargo that needs a greater height capacity. The other major difference is a standard flatbed has only one-floor height, whereas low bed trailers typically have lower and higher deck portions.

What sizes do flatbed trailers come in?

Bed length and deck height are the two most important factors when considering flatbeds. Most flatbed trailers used in US freight fall in the standard semi-trailer range of 48-53’, though oversized and shorter options do exist. Bed heights typically range from 48-60” and can even be adjustable, allowing them to work with various loading dock dimensions.

What is the difference between a flatbed and a van trailer?

Unlike dry vans, flatbeds lack sides, backs, or roofs, making them much more versatile than an enclosed dry van container. This open deck design of a flatbed trailer allows for a wider variety of cargo to be carried, while also allowing for loading from the sides, rear, or even the top using a crane.

When you need to haul goods in an unenclosed container due to its size, shape or unique loading requirements, the flatbed trailer is your trailer of choice. This great versatility of flatbeds is expanded even further because they come in numerous designs, which we’ll detail in this article. We'll also explore the essential aspects of these trailers, including their unique features, applications, advantages, specifications, and more. 

Last but not least, we'll provide valuable insights for understanding:

  • Flatbed trailer freight pricing,

  • How to select a reliable flatbed trailer freight broker for your next shipment,

And provide information about where to quickly and easily get a freight quote for a flatbed trailer

What is a Flatbed Trailer?

Flatbed trailers offer a simple yet effective solution for hauling cargo that doesn't fit well in enclosed trailers or requires top-loading and unloading capabilities. Unlike dry vans, flatbed trailers feature an open and flat platform without walls or roofs, making them suitable for a variety of cargo types, including oversized, heavy, or irregularly shaped loads.

Types of Flatbed Trailers

The class of flatbed trailers come in several configurations to accommodate different types of cargo. What they all have in common is their  “deck over design”, which simply means the deck lies flat over the wheels. And no matter the configuration, every type of flatbed trailer also lacks side walls or a top roof, and this open design allows for easy side or top loading when necessary. 

Next, we’ll detail some of the more popular trailers that fall into the flatbed category that are commonly used in freight.

Standard Flatbed Trailer

This is the most common type of flatbed trailer, featuring a flat, open deck with no sides or roof. Typically between 48-53’,it’s a versatile trailer option and can transport a wide range of goods, including construction materials, machinery, and more.

Step Deck Flatbed Trailer

The flatbed variant of step deck trailers have a lower deck in the front section, providing added vertical clearance. This design is advantageous for transporting tall or oversized cargo that requires more headroom.

Extendable Flatbed Trailer

The flatbed variant of extendable trailers can be adjusted to various lengths, allowing for the transportation of exceptionally long or oversized cargo. This flexibility makes them suitable for specialized hauling requirements.

Multi-Axle Flatbed Trailer

Multi-axle flatbed trailers are equipped with additional axles to accommodate heavier loads while ensuring stability and compliance with local regulations. Double, triple and even quadruple axle flatbeds exist for hauling extra heavy machinery.

Drop Deck Flatbed Trailer:

The flatbed variant of drop deck trailers feature a lower deck in the front section, similar to step deck trailers, but also have a drop in the rear section. This design allows for added vertical clearance and easier loading and unloading. It also comes in a double drop-deck option.

Lowboy Trailer

Given their low center of gravity and extra-high clearance, lowboy trailers are the ideal trailer for hauling oversized cargo that won’t fit on a standard or step-deck flatbed trailer. This makes them ideal for hauling huge machinery like bulldozers, construction vehicles or other super-sized cargo. 

Gooseneck Trailer (Folding and Removable or “RGN”)

A gooseneck trailer is a type of flatbed trailer defined by its long, arching neck that connects over the deck of the trailer rather than down at the floor-level like a standard bumper pull trailer. This allows for better load balancing and a tighter turning radius, which can prove essential in a crowded or urban environments 

Gooseneck trailers come in both folding and removable (RGN) options. 

Conestoga Trailer

Defined by their rolling tarp system over the cargo area, conestoga trailers combine the convenience of a flatbed design combined with the protective cover provided by a dry van trailer.

Side-kit Trailer

Side-kit trailers are a variant of flatbeds with removable sides, adding some degree of enclosure and protection from the elements, especially from wind and road debris.

Specifications of Flatbed Trailers

Cargo Carried

Flatbed trailers are versatile and can transport a wide variety of goods, including construction materials, machinery, vehicles, and more.

Trailer Length Options:

Flatbed trailers come in various lengths, ranging from standard 48-foot trailers to extended lengths as needed for specialized applications.

Dimensions:

The maximum dimensions typically adhere to standard semi-trailer specifications, ensuring compatibility with transportation infrastructure.

Axles:

Flatbed trailers are typically equipped with 2 to 3 axles, depending on load capacity and local regulations.

Trailer Weight:

The weight of a flatbed trailer varies based on design and material but generally falls within the range of 10,000 to 30,000 lbs.

Maximum Load:

Maximum load capacities depend on the trailer's design and quantity of axles but must comply with regulations to ensure safe and legal transportation. The max load on US roadways is 80,000 lbs.

Unique Features and Advantages of Flatbed Trailers

Flatbed trailers are equipped with unique features that set them apart from enclosed trailers and make them suitable for various cargo types.

Open Deck Design: Ease of Loading and Unloading:

The most prominent feature unique to flatbed trailers is their open deck design. This lack of walls or roof allows for quick and efficient loading and unloading of cargo from the top, sides or rear, making them much more versatile than a dry van or box truck. an open, flat deck with no walls or roof, allowing for easy loading and unloading from the top, sides, or rear.

Variety of Sizes and Types: Allows for High Loading Capacity

Another great feature of flatbed trailers is the diversity of sizes and designs available. As you’ve learned, there are various types of flatbed trailer designs available for freight shipments depending on if you need additional cargo capacity, load capacity, higher clearance, better turn radius, or some level of protection from the elements.

Securement Options

Just because flatbeds have an open design, that doesn’t mean the cargo they carry is insecure. Flatbed trailers come with various cargo securement options, including straps, chains, d-ring, tie down points or stake pockets. Rest assured, no matter what you’re transporting, your goods will be secured to prevent damage no matter which type of flatbed you choose.

Applications and Common Cargo of Flatbed Trailers

Given flatbed trailers’ great versatility and variety of designs, they have applications across numerous industries, serving a broad range of shipping needs, including:

Construction and Building Materials: Flatbed trailers are commonly used to transport construction materials, lumber, steel, concrete forms, and heavy machinery to construction sites.

Manufacturing and Industrial: Industrial equipment, machinery, and oversized components can be efficiently transported using flatbed trailers.

Agriculture: Flatbed trailers are utilized for hauling farm equipment, large bales of hay, and other agricultural products.

Automotive: Flatbed trailers are great for transporting vehicles, including cars, trucks, and heavy machinery, similar to car carrier trailers.

Wind Energy: The wind energy industry relies on flatbed trailers to transport wind turbine components, tower sections, and blades to wind farm sites.

Permits and Compliance Requirements for Flatbed Trailers

Compliance and permit requirements for flatbed trailers are essential to ensure safe and legal transportation. Specific regulations may vary by state and type of cargo, but here are some key considerations when transporting goods via flatbed in the United States:

Overdimensional Permits: Depending on the size and dimensions of the cargo, overdimensional permits may be required to transport oversized loads on flatbed trailers.

Weight Limits: Flatbed trailers must comply with federal and state weight limits, including axle weight and gross weight restrictions.

Route Surveys: For extremely large or heavy loads, a route survey might be necessary to ensure the planned route can accommodate the size and weight of the load without causing damage to roads, bridges, or other infrastructure.

Escort Vehicles/Pilot Cars: Oversized loads often require escort vehicles or pilot cars. These vehicles help ensure road safety by escorting the flatbed through traffic and alerting other road users.

Safety Equipment and Signage: Loads that exceed certain dimensions must be marked with flags, banners, and lights. This is to increase visibility and warn other drivers, especially in poor visibility conditions.

Load Securement: Proper cargo securement is essential to prevent load shifting during transit. Flatbed trailers must comply with cargo securement regulations outlined in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR).

Hazardous Materials: If flatbed trailers are used to transport hazardous materials, drivers and carriers must adhere to the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) outlined by the FMCSA. This includes obtaining the necessary hazardous materials endorsements on the driver's CDL and complying with specific labeling, placarding, and documentation requirements.

Driver Qualifications: Drivers hauling specialized loads often need additional training or endorsements on their commercial driver's license (CDL), such as for oversized loads or hazardous materials.

Selecting a Flatbed Freight Broker

When hiring a flatbed trailer freight company, consider the following factors to ensure a smooth and reliable transportation process:

  • Reputation and Experience: Research the company's reputation and seek reviews and testimonials from previous clients, particularly those with similar shipping needs.
  • Equipment and Technology: Ensure the company's fleet includes well-maintained and modern flatbed trailers equipped with the latest technology for cargo safety and tracking.
  • Compliance and Certification: Confirm that the flatbed freight company adheres to industry regulations and standards, especially when handling hazardous materials.
  • Security Measures: Assess the company's security protocols to safeguard cargo during transit, including load securement, locking systems, and tracking capabilities.
  • Insurance Coverage: Verify the extent of insurance coverage for your cargo and understand the claims process in case of incidents during transportation.
  • Operational Support: Evaluate the company's customer support and communication capabilities, ensuring timely updates on shipment status.
  • Route Planning and Efficiency: Inquire about the company's route planning strategies to optimize transit times and minimize delays.
  • Environmental Considerations: If environmental sustainability is important to your business, inquire about the company's eco-friendly practices and efforts to reduce emissions.
  • Cost and Billing Transparency: Understand the company's pricing structure and inquire about any additional charges for specialized services. Ensure transparency in billing.

Flatbed Trailer Freight Pricing

Flatbed trailer freight pricing is influenced by a variety of factors, reflecting the complexity of the transportation industry. Here are the key elements that generally determine the cost of shipping using a flatbed trailer:

Distance and Route: The length of the haul is a primary factor. Longer distances increase fuel costs, driver hours, and overall wear and tear on the equipment. Additionally, the specific route taken (including tolls, traffic conditions, and terrain) can affect costs.

Cargo Type and Weight: Heavier and bulkier cargo typically costs more to transport due to the increased fuel consumption and the need for special handling or equipment. Specialized cargo requiring additional care or equipment for securement (like oversized or fragile items) can also increase costs.

Equipment Type: Do you need a standard, step deck, lowboy or RGN?  The type of flatbed needed can influence the price. Specialized or oversized trailers often command a higher rate due to their unique features and limited availability.

Fuel Costs: Fluctuations in fuel prices directly impact freight rates, as fuel is a significant operational cost for carriers.

Seasonal Demand: During peak seasons, when demand for flatbed trailers is high, prices tend to increase. This can be influenced by industry-specific cycles, like construction booms or agricultural harvests.

Supply and Demand in Specific Regions: Availability of flatbed trailers in a particular area can affect pricing. For example, if there's a surplus of loads needing transport from a region but a shortage of available trailers, prices may increase.

Accessorial Charges: Additional services like tarping, layovers, detention time, or special permits for oversized/overweight loads can add to the cost.

Market Conditions: The overall economic environment, including industry trends and regulatory changes, can impact freight rates.

Insurance Costs: Higher-value cargo may require additional insurance, which can increase the overall shipping cost.

Understanding these factors can help shippers negotiate fair rates that reflect the specific needs and challenges of each flatbed shipment. It's also worth noting that rates can vary significantly between carriers and over time, so it's beneficial for shippers to stay informed about current market conditions.

If you’re looking for a great rate on flatbed freight, we’d recommend contacting a freight broker like Guided Freight. We work with all the major carriers, meaning we have the largest inventory of flatbeds in the US market. And given we book flatbeds for our customers virtually everyday, we’re able to pass along savings thanks to our high-volume rates, providing significant cost-savings for our customers. 

Flatbed Trailer Services & Freight Quote

If your company requires the services of a flatbed trailer for a freight shipment, Guided Freight is happy to assist. As a trusted freight broker, we specialize in managing complex logistics for seamless transportation. Obtaining a flatbed trailer freight quote from our company is quick and straightforward.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between a flatbed trailer and a low-bed trailer?

The primary difference between a flatbed and a lowbed trailer is the height capacity. Low bed trailers like step and drop decks allow for the transport of cargo that needs a greater height capacity. The other major difference is a standard flatbed has only one-floor height, whereas low bed trailers typically have lower and higher deck portions.

What sizes do flatbed trailers come in?

Bed length and deck height are the two most important factors when considering flatbeds. Most flatbed trailers used in US freight fall in the standard semi-trailer range of 48-53’, though oversized and shorter options do exist. Bed heights typically range from 48-60” and can even be adjustable, allowing them to work with various loading dock dimensions.

What is the difference between a flatbed and a van trailer?

Unlike dry vans, flatbeds lack sides, backs, or roofs, making them much more versatile than an enclosed dry van container. This open deck design of a flatbed trailer allows for a wider variety of cargo to be carried, while also allowing for loading from the sides, rear, or even the top using a crane.

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